Kingdom Men, Aggression, and the Warrior Spirit

The First Adam paints a picture of what God intended manhood to be.

God created Adam to be a servant, a warrior, a scholar, a craftsman, an explorer, a leader, and a disciple

He then placed the First Adam in the Garden of Eden with an assignment: to be a watchman and a protector. Adam was to defend and to preserve the garden and all its inhabitants.

God gave Adam all the tools he needed to “keep” the garden.

Adam was created to fight against the world’s enemy and his mission to steal, kill and destroy.

Adam was entrusted to fight for his relationship with God and Eve, and all the inhabitants of the garden.

But when the enemy invaded Adam’s domain and tricked Eve, Adam failed to protect her. Instead of defending his wife and his land and his relationship with God, Adam defended himself and blamed Eve and God.

The man said, "The woman you put here with me -- she gave me some fruit from the tree, and I ate it. " 

Genesis 3:12

Adam likely misunderstood his warrior spirit, just as many of us do today. He likely failed to understand that manly aggression, guided by Kingdom principles, was one of the tools God gave him to protect his domain.

He also failed to understand that it was his heritage as a son of God.

The LORD is a warrior; the LORD is his name.

Exodus 15:3

John Eldredge explains in his book Wild At Heart that the warrior spirit shows up in childhood when we pretend to be soldiers, knights, cowboys, and superheroes.

It often continues into adulthood in our interest in guns, knives, action movies, and even video games that depict a battle between good and evil.

But somewhere along the way, society convinces us that aggression is always bad; that it’s toxic, and it’s destroying us.

The world asks, “What Would Jesus Do?” and prompts us to respond accordingly. It suggests that Jesus teaches only meekness, mildness, and timidity.

But the world overlooks the fact that when Jesus found unethical behavior happening in the temple at Passover, he drove out the thieves who were defiling His Father’s house.

So he made a whip out of cords, and drove all from the temple courts, both sheep and cattle; he scattered the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables.

John 2:15

Jesus’ Kingdom aggression was born of his responsibility to protect and defend, and it was measured and appropriate.

Even today, our families, our workplaces, our communities, and our churches need this brand of Kingdom aggression. At the same time, men need a battle to fight. We are hard-wired for it, and it’s a major component of our legacy on earth.

Instead, we give in to fear or we turn a blind eye to the battles around us. In the very worst of cases, we use our manly aggression against those we are called to protect.

Decide for yourself:

·      Where did your imagination take you as a young man?

·      Do any of those interests still exist for you as an adult?

·      When would Kingdom aggression be justified in your own mind?

The men of Junto Tribe seek these answers on a daily basis because the world needs us to know who we were created to be.

We don’t seek to spoon-feed you the answers, but rather to help you seek them through your own relationship with Jesus.

This is an ongoing conversation about questions that will exist as long as we live in a broken world.

The world doesn’t hesitate to share its opinions with you, but it only gives you one side of the story.

What if the world is wrong?

 

 

photo: https://pixabay.com/en/medieval-knight-fight-sword-2335880/